Best Times of the Year for Wine Tours in Europe

Best Times of the Year for Wine Tours in Europe

People always ask us “when is the best time to come to the wine country in Europe” and the answer we always give is, the best times of the year for wine tours in Europe are May or June for good weather and less crowds and of course September and October during the harvest time. Often however, those months might not correspond to the vacation time available to you!

Not to worry, here is a list of suggestions of great regions to visit month by month, to give you inspiration when planning your wine tour in Europe:

January: Sicily

Enjoy the ski slopes of Etna one day and the beach the next! Sicily is a great destination in winter and offers varied landscapes, stunning wines (Donnafugata, Planeta, Tasca d´Almerita and more) and a fascinating architectural mix from Moorish to Norman, medieval to Spanish. Visit Taormina, Etna wine country, Siracusa, Ragusa, Cerasulo di Vittoria wine country, Marsala wine country, the salt mounds near Trapani and the unique city of Palermo.

February: Alentejo

We´ve mentioned Alentejo before, as being a good option for a winter wine tour and say it again! While temperatures can certainly be crisp and bracingly cold, the sun is almost always shining in the Alentejo in winter, the rich red wines will warm you up and there are virtually no crowds. The landscapes are monumental, with noble cork forests, Arabic castles and vast vineyard-covered hills punctuated by white and yellow Quintas. Stay at the fabulous Convento do Espinheiro near Évora and spend a few days relaxing in this simply delightful, unspoiled wine region.

March: Amalfi Coast

La Bella Campania- what a wonderful region to visit in Spring! The Amalfi Coast and Capri are flourishing with wild flowers, the sun is shining and the oppressive summer crowds have not arrived. Naples is one of the most interesting cities in Italy, and home of the Vera Pizza and our favorite Archeological Museum in the world (with 99% of the collection of mosaics from Pompeii). The geographic configuration of the Amalfi Coast features a memorable setting. It runs alongside the sea with the trend of an antique piece of lace and soars towards the sky with its high mountains peaks. From the coast to the Lattari mountains, the streets and the terraces are built on small patches of land reclaimed from the rock. The small artificially turf rock built areas, were laboriously filled with soil by man. Here the establishment of vineyards from which DOC labeled selected wines are produced, under the name of Amalfi Coast, divided into three subzones: Furore, Ravello and Tramonti. Wide on average no more than five meters, the terraces have an irregular profile imposed by the anarchy of the rock. Each terraces hosts an average of four rows of vines aligned on geometrical laid out pergolas of chestnut poles.

The first local wine producers of the Coast had farming and fishing traditions and only in the recent decades, they have discovered the importance of their fine products and today DOC vine zones cover virtually the entire hilly area of the Amalfi Coast, between Positano and Vietri, even though the more suitable areas can be divided in three locations: Furore, Ravello and Tramonti. The grapes outline an important balance between taste, persistence, perfumes, tannin and acidity. A mix given to the wisdom of the winemaker to its former confidence in handling this winemaking process, all under the banner of empiricism, governed only by the moonlit nights and the trust their senses and experience. Grape varieties are Fenile, Tronto of Furore, Ripolo, Pepella, Sciascinoso and Tintore of Tramonti. These grapes are closely linked to the territory, and in some cases exclusive of the hinterland of Amalfi.

April: Andalucía

Andalucía (Southern Spain) is alive with local fiestas and celebrations in April and also a great time to visit Jerez, in the heart of the Sherry wine country. Many bodegas (wine cellars) are located right downtown. The Sherry wines are delicious, varied and completely and utterly undervalued. Taste a slightly chilled Amontillado while sitting in a flower covered Andalusian “patio” and nibble on juicy olives and pan-fried almonds… oh, and don´t forget the relaxing sounds of the Spanish Flamenco guitar, olé! Seville is also a short one hour train ride away.

May: Friuli Venezia Giulia

Cantine Aperte’ or ‘Open Wine Cantinas’ means that the wine cellars of the associates of the Movimento Turismo del Vino throw open their doors and you can sample some of the best wines in Italy. In Friuli Venezia Giulia, the event is coordinated by the regional delegation of the Movimento Turismo del Vino based in Udine www.mtvfriulivg.it. The event is a big draw for locals but many Austrians and Germans cross the borders to visit the wine cellars and cantinas across the region. Don’t forget that on entering your first wine cellar for the event, you will be able to purchase the traditional Cantine Aperte wine glass. This serves as an attractive entrance ‘ticket’ for subsequent cellar visits during the day or weekend.

‘Lungo le Strade del Vino’ is the essential Friuli wine itineraries guide to discover the wine cantinas and wine producers of the region. Lavishly produced by the Movimento Turismo del Vino Friuli Venezia Giulia the region is split into six manageable areas, each with a suggested itinerary. The 8 DOC territories of Friuli Venezia Giulia are the Colli Orientali del Friuli, Friuli Grave, Friuli Aquileia, Friuli Latisana, Friuli Annia, Collio, Friuli Isonzo and Carso. All the cantinas indicated in the guide can be visited on request throughout the year, but if there’s an ideal moment to visit an area and talk to the wine makers, it might just be during the annual Cantine Aperte in May, a national event in Italy.

May: Bordeaux

Bordeaux is the perennial wine destination in Europe and often a “first” wine tour for wine enthusiasts. It is pretty much a wine lovers dream. The city itself is handsome and sophisticated, kind of a mini Paris, with a wide array of sights, fine hotels, wine bars, wine shops, and gourmet restaurants. It´s also on the door step of some of the most famous wine appellations in the world (whose “Chateaux” are often gorgeous)- Saint Emilion (also one of the prettiest villages in the region), Pomerol, Médoc, Margaux, Pauillac, Saint Julien, Sauternes, the list goes on. You can easily spend a week to 10 days visiting the wine country surrounding Bordeaux, town, and even combine a tour to Cognac (to the north) or Armagnac (to the south). If time permits, spend some time in neighboring Dordogne, one of the most breathtaking regions in Europe.

June: Douro Valley

For years this dramatically beautiful wine region was a best kept secret, known only to the Portuguese themselves, port fanatics and wine professionals. However, the luxurious Aquapura hotel opening and the New York Times article that followed (in 2007), has put the Douro Valley firmly on the radar for both casual and serious wine lovers. Expect  to find striking scenery, vintage ports, spectacular dry reds (and some dry whites), and a small but fantastic collection of hotels and restaurants, enough to easily satisfy you on a long weekend or even a week long tour if combined with the historic port lodges of Vilanova, across from Oporto. Take a private Rabelo cruise on the Douro and let the soothing landscapes glide by while sipping on chilled white port.

July: La Rioja

Another region that was a well known secret for years, is La Rioja. And funny enough, it was also the launch of a luxury hotel (designed by Frank Gehry at the Marqués de Riscal wine estate) that garnished world attention on it. Rioja is always a delight to visit, but we quite like it in summer as temperatures are sunny and warm, the vineyards are lush and green, and you can combine a few days wine tasting here with a few days at the beach in beautiful San Sebastian (gourmet mecca, about 90 minutes north). Haro is home to some of the most historic “chateau” style wineries like Muga, Lopez de Heredia and Cune, all of which offer scheduled tours in English. If visiting Haro don´t miss lunch at Las Duelas, one of our favorites. For something more exclusive, go on a private wine tour to cult estates like Roda and Remirez de Ganuza.

August: Penedès

Again, we like the Penedès in the summer as you can combine a few days in the wine country (staying at Can Bonastre), with a few days at the beach (while closer to the Costa Daurada, that coastline is over exploited so we recommend the beaches of the Costa Brava such as Aiguablava and Sa Tuna). Located just under an hour from Barcelona (so a viable day trip), Penedès is the home of Spain´s sparkling “Cava”, as well as a host of red and white wines from such famed producers as Miguel Torres and Jean Leon, and high end estates like Pares Balta.  The famous Cava producers Freixenet and Codorniu open up daily for tours. There are some great restaurants in this region including Can Bonastre’s Tribia for high end, and Cal Xim for an authentic winemaker´s haunt. And for something unique, visit the ultra charming owners at Augustus Forum, making the best vinegars in Spain!

September: Tuscany

Tuscany is a place you should visit at least once in your life! The splendid art cities of Siena, Lucca and Florence; the medieval villages of San Gimignano and Volterra; adorable hamlets like Monterriggioni,  San Miniato and Radda in Chianti are treats on the eye. And the fine wines of Chianti, Montalcino (Brunello), Maremma (Super Tuscans), Montepulciano (Vino Nobile) and countless smaller appellations, are what will attract you wine lovers. Tuscany is beautiful any month of the year, but September is a wonderful time to visit as the vineyards are beautiful and there is excitement in the air in the wine villages with the starting of the harvest.  Chianti is the region most established for wine tourism and many estates open up for general tours. For something more luxurious and private, take a chauffeured tour of the region on a grand tour or enjoy day trips from Tuscany´s main cities.

October: Piedmont

October is the start of the white truffle season in Piedmont (and the truffle festival in Alba) and the ideal month to visit this gourmet wine region. The landscapes of the Langhe in October are probably some of the most picturesque and beautiful we have ever seen. The restaurants, some of the best in Italy, all feature special truffle menus in autumn and a foodie tour here is an epicure´s wish come true. Piedmont is also home to the Slow Food movement (founded in the town of “Bra”). Wine lovers flock here as the mythical Barolo is produced here, as well as Barbaresco and Gavi. There are wonderful farm stay options, boutique hotels, and between wine tasting (Roagna, Massolino and Braida for its Barbera) , cheese tasting, truffle hunting and/tasting, and fine dining, you can easily spend a week of gourmet bliss in Piedmont.

November: Burgundy

Bourgogne, Burgundy, is another region equally delicious! And November is a wonderful time to visit as the autumn colors on the vineyards are marvelous and the chill in the air is perfect to enjoy the region´s sublime red wines from Cote de  Nuits, Gevrey -Chambertain, Volnay, Pommard and of course Vosne-Romanée. Burgundy´s white wines are also world famous and you can taste them in their birthplace here in Meursault, Chablis, Puligny -Montrachet, etc. Your base could be in beautiful Beaune or in Dijon (yes, the home of Dijon mustard) or in any of the countless little wine villages in between. Noyers, Buxyand Vézelay are particularly delightful. Some highlights of Burgundy include the Abbey of Cluny; the spectacular Romanesque church of Vézelay; the Abbey of Fontenay; and the pristine scenery; the pretty Chateau Meursault and Chateau of Bussy-Rabutin; the Clos de Vougeot; and of course the hundreds of wineries. And if time permits, you could also do a combo Burgundy and Champagne tour!

December: Alsace

Alsace is the quintessential winter destination with its charming Christmas markets and fairy tale villages. It feels German at the same time as it feels French and in fact has belonged to both countries. One of the main dishes here is Sauerkraut! The region´s neat vineyards, villages and farms are nestled in between the Vosges mountains to the west and the Rhine river to the east. While a microscopic amount of red wine is made here, Alsace is famous for its voluptuous and spicy white wines, perfect winter whites in fact. Stay in the darling village of Riquewihr and enjoy wine tasting at the numerous cellars located along the 38 vineyard trails on the designated “Route de Vin”. Top wines to look out for include Marcel Deiss, Zind- Humbrecht, Trimbach, and Weinbach.

Audrey helps you make your vacation truly memorable by offering cultural vacations to northern Italy and private tours that promise a personal experience you will not find anywhere else.

About Audrey De Monte

Born in New York City, raised in Western Africa, I have studied, lived and worked on three continents (Africa, Europe and North America), and have traveled extensively throughout the world. Travel has shaped my life, who I am, how I look at the world and continues to be my biggest teacher. Together with my native Italian husband, we speak 5 languages. Western Europe is my backyard, in particular Spain, France, Germany, and Italy—countries where I have spent my life, since early childhood, visiting family, friends, studying, living and working.